Monthly Archives: January 2014

Tyson Foods Recalls 34,000 Pounds of Chicken

Tyson Foods Inc. is recalling nearly 34,000 pounds of mechanically separated chicken products due to possible Salmonella contaminant. The chicken parts were not shipped to supermarkets for customers, but instead it was intended for use in institutions and had been already shipped to California, Florida, Indiana, Kansas, Nevada, New Jersey, Ohio and Wisconsin.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) and Tyson Foods said they were voluntarily recalling the 40-pound cases of chicken. The products were produced on Oct. 11, 2013. The product can be identified by the establishment code P-13556, which is located inside the USDA mark of inspection, as well as with the code date 2843SDL1412-18. The product cases can be identified by code 17433-928 which is printed on the exterior label.

The recall was issued after FSIS was made aware of people at a Tennessee correctional facility was infected with the particular strain, Salmonella Heidelberg, on Dec. 12, 2013. After some investigation and working with the Tennessee Department of Health, results show that seven patients at the facility had been sickened by the bacteria between Nov 29, 2013 to Dec 5, 2013, two of them required hospitalization.

This is not the first time Tyson Foods Inc. has issued recalls. In 2012, over 67,000 pounds of their “Honey BBQ Flavored Boneless Chicken Wyngz” were recalled due to mis-branding and allergens that weren’t reported on the label. In 2013, about 127,000 pounds of uncooked breaded chicken tenderloins and uncooked chicken tenderloin fritter products, for the same reason.

The public can contact Tyson Consumer Relations department at 866-886-8456 with any questions or concerns.

According to the CDC (Center for Disease Control and Prevention), there are about 42,000 cases of salmonellosis that is reported each year in the United States. The CDC also states that the actual number of infections may be 29 or more times greater, as not all cases are diagnosed or reported.

People infected with Salmonella may develop diarrhea, fever, and abdominal cramps 12 to 72 hours after infection. The illness typically lasts 4 to 7 days.

A recent report from Consumer Reports showed that 97 percent of raw chicken breasts researchers tested had contained potentially harmful bacteria.

People can prevent salmonellosis by cooking poultry, ground beef and eggs thoroughly. When preparing meat, wash hands, kitchen work surfaces and utensils with soap and water after they come in contact with raw meat or poultry. Those in contact with infants should not handle raw poultry and meat at the same time.

The TPP and Your Food

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 Will more or less regulations make food our safer? How about knowing where your food comes from and who is producing it?

Since Monsanto controls the government via the Monsanto Protection Act, it appears much of a shoe-in for big agricultural chemical companies (others include Dow Chemical, DuPont, Syngenta, Bayer and BASF) to control the food supply. Monsanto has a well known track record of intimidating and harassing farmers from replanting their seeds, cross contamination and what ever else their Gestapo employees find to start up lawsuits against small farmers.

So how would the TPP effect the food industry (not that Big-Ag needs any more help at the moment)? Here’s a quick run down.

Small farmers and producers will essentially be put out of business. The TPP could replace small farms and communities with large agribusinesses, more so than they currently are.

Food safety standards would be reduced to a bare minimum. More so than the FDA and USDA uphold today (personally, I wouldn’t trust much of anything these two agencies report even today. Their standards aren’t in our best interests).

The fight for labeling foods would be a thing of the past. Monsanto will use the TPP to pull a few more strings to make it illegal to label products containing GMOs.

Finally, governments would not be able to support local food. Under TPP, public institutions (universities, schools, hospitals, etc.) may not be allowed to use local farms as a source of food, as it would violate free-trade terms by discriminating against foreign farms.

It’s no wonder why these companies (including local, state and federal government agencies) make it hard for citizens to grow their own food and become self sustainable. It’s only a step towards world domination. It’s no accident TPP is being dealt in secret and GMO labeling isn’t being passed by our elected officials. But now is the time to step up and take a stand. Let your voice be heard and contact your representatives to stop Fast Track and vote NO on the TPP.

“Control oil and you control nations; control food and you control the people.“ –Henry Kissinger

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